Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Wet and Aggressive Corella challenges Magpie

Thursday, 20 July 2017

Warm Trees 2017

Each year, our National Arboretum, has an exhibit called 'Warm Trees'.  Selected trees are given winter woollies to combat the cold - and entice more visitors to the arboretum.  The woollies are knitted by volunteers.  This year we are told that when the exhibit is over the woollies will be repurposed, and washed (repaired if necessary before being given to cold humans and/or animals.  Which is lovely. 

We headed off on a chilly day last week and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves.  Given the number of people there I think the inducement was successful.  The arboretum is still a baby and I will be long gone by the time it reaches its peak, but it is a lovely idea and I am always happy to visit.  More forests are planted each year, which I love.  I enjoy the colourful quirkiness of the warm trees exhibit too.
 













Not all of the trees are decorated.  While we were in the area we stopped at the Dragon Tree forest.  And at last some of them are being released/escaping from their cages.  And fruiting.




This is how they looked in previous years.




I look forward to the year when they are totally uncaged...  In the meantime we wandered off to the visitors centre.




Some of the bonsai have also been rugged up.  Just a teeny bit.  And some, despite being tortured were in beautiful bloom.





Looking out the windows there were more woollies to see - and a kite.  I do love kites.




I like the inside of the visitor's centre too.  I think it is stylish.  Lots of light, lots of natural materials. 




Just a few more photos now.





At one stage someone mooted the idea of using the arboretum for eco-funerals.  No coffin, no headstones.  I would very happily sign up to feed the trees. 

117 comments:

  1. Feeding the trees at the end is something I'd subscribe to as well, EC.

    Such wonderful ideas people have to wrap woollies around the trees. A bit of colour and warmth when it is cold. Bravo, Aussies brothers and sisters. And they'll be passed on...

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    1. Marie Smith: I really hope I can have an eco-burial. And yes, it is a great idea that this year the woollies will be passed on. I hope the same quirkiness goes into the repurposed items.

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  2. I love the warm woolies....what a great idea. Today we watched a perfectly good tree be murdered on our street. It was the saddest thing.

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    1. only slightly confused: A whole avenue of trees in our city has been murdered to make way for light rail. And I mourn.

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  3. Just LOVE to see the woolies, and your happy post in my news feed. And I'm not #152, either! Yay!

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    1. DJan: Nope, very early to the party today - and I am glad you enjoyed the woollies.

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  4. That sure is something to look forward to, wonderful idea and photos indeed.

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  5. It's a magnificent gesture by the arboretum. I hope it goes well.

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    1. Treey Stynes: It is in its fourth or fifth year now. I think it has become a tradition - and I welcome it.

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  6. Can you imagine using a blanket that used to be a tree warmer; nice!!

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  7. Replies
    1. Author R. Mac Wheeler: I am a decided tree hugger too.

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  8. wow what a great idea WArm idea

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    1. Gosia k: Isn't it? Yarn-bombing for trees.

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  9. warm trees I have never seen in Europe

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    1. Gosia k: Perhaps you could start a trend when winter comes.

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  10. So cute!!! It really makes the landscape more attractive!!

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    1. Catarina: And over the years to come the landscape will look better and better. And better.

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  11. Dear EC
    The splashes of colour made me smile and excellent news that the woollies will be reused. I really liked the 'dragon' dragon tree cage too.
    I'm contemplating a green burial when the time comes and like the idea of helping to create a woodland.
    Best wishes
    Ellie

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    1. Ellie Foster: It is fun isn't it, and lovely to think that the woollies will go to good homes. I am impressed that the support is going to animals as well as people.

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  12. Wild how they wrap everything up. Well, almost everything.

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    1. Alex J. Cavanaugh: There is always room for quirky fun in my world.

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  13. Yes, i'd want to feed the trees, too. That's a beautiful place, and i love the whimsey of the woolies.

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    1. messymimi: I hope the idea gets revisited. It strikes me as close to perfect - and the arboretum will get better and better (even if we are never allowed to feed it).

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  14. oh my what a wonderful place to visit; and love the architecture of the building; the tree with two arms is something to see. are the cages for the dragon trees to protect them from the cold and/or keep them upright. It would be wonderful to see what the arboretum will look like in the future.?

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    1. Linda Starr: I have never found out what the dragon cages are for. They were originally caged in summer too. Warding off kangaroos? I was really pleased to see them finally emerging.

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  15. I like the ideas, and I like the pictures!

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    1. Bill: Welcome and thank you. It is a lovely idea isn't it?

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  16. I like the idea of repurposing the quilts for people or animals who need them, also the eco funeral idea is not a bad one.

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    1. Jimmy: I am a fan of both ideas. And hope the eco funeral's become more common.

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  17. I would love to visit these places. The woolies is a great idea.
    r

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    1. Rick Watson: I am always in favour of fun. Lots of fun.

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  18. Very colourful. Tree planting by older people is a very unselfish thing to do, as they will never see the mature tree. Instead the youngers will have the pleasure and benefit.

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    1. Andrew: I had never thought about it being unselfish. Perhaps because my childless self likes the idea of leaving trees behind me?

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  19. For one who has rarely seen a sweater wearing tree, this was a treat. Thank you for all of the great photos.

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    1. Martin Kloess: I am so very glad that you also enjoyed our treat.

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  20. I love the trees and the chance to re-purpose coverings from them. Wonderful photos. Hope you are having a good week?

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    1. e: Thank you. The week has been a bit like the parson's egg - good in parts. I hope your renovations are drawing to a close. Hugs.

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  21. The trees in their finery made me smile - especially, I'll admit, the ones who seemed squeezed into their coverings - I can identify :)

    What a beautiful spot. Sure would like to see it fifty years from now, or a hundred.

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    1. jenny_o: The 'tubby' trees made me smile too. And yes, to see the arboretum in 50, 100, 150 years would be amazing...

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  22. The visitor center does look stylish, but the trees warmly dressed look more wonderful to me and I'm very pleased to see the dragon trees emerging at last. I'm in favour of eco-funerals too.

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    1. River: I was beginning to think the dragon trees would always be caged. I am glad to be wrong.

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  23. I'm reminded of an old quote: "The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The next best time is today"

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    1. River: That is a BRILLIANT quote. I love it.

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  24. Replies
    1. Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe: It is. They are adding more sculptures to the site too.

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  25. Hi EC - love the idea of the warm trees concept - and they look so pretty for a change ... and I hadn't realised the Arboretum is so new ... they are certainly innovative in their thoughts. Love the kite - and great that the Dragon trees are escaping.

    River's quote is excellent isn't it ... loved all your photos outside and in ... I'd visit often too ... delightful -cheers Hilary

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    1. Hilary Melton-Butcher: I still think of the arboretum as a baby arboretum (and sometimes call it that as well). It is getting better year after year.
      River's quote was perfect wasn't it?

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  26. Hello!:) Brilliantly colourful to see, and a great crowd pleaser. Doing our bit to save trees is vital to their preservation. I like the domed ceiling of the visitor centre and the beams, and love the bonsai exhibits and the whole idea of this yearly event.

    Thousands of trees have perished in forest fires this year in Portugal, it will take years to establish new ones. The fires are still burning!!

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    1. Breathtaking: Welcome and thank you. We love trees every year to fires and it breaks my heart. I hope your fires can be put out soon, and mourn with you for the lost trees.

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  27. Fantastic photos, as always.
    Like Breathtaking said, we have forest fires too, in BC. We need rain so much. There haven't been one for over a month now.

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    1. Olga Godim: Fires are terrifying. We get most of our rain in winter, and have had very little this year. Which doesn't auger well for summer. I hope you too get some relief.

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  28. What lovely shots. Those woolies are adorable!

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    1. Lady Fi: I think whoever had the idea in the first place is someone I would like to know.

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  29. Such a colorful sight. You couldn't help but smile. Love the photos and the fact that the woolies will be repurposed.

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    1. Mason Canyon: There were lots of smiles, and lots of visitors to the arboretum. Win/win.

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  30. Thank you for sharing this awesome arboretum EC. I love the fact that those woollies will be repurposed. The visitor center looks delightful. Great post and loved your photos.

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    1. Denise inVA: Thank you. It really is a lovely place.

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  31. I remember Warm Trees from last year. What fun!

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    1. Sandra Cox: As a creature of habit I will almost certainly go next year too. And the year after.

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  32. PS As always, you got some great shots!

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    1. Sandra Cox: Aren't digital cameras wonderful?

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  33. I like those "clothes of trees", Sometimes they wear trees also here.
    The bonsais looks lovely.
    I live in a country were is forrets 86 % of the land area (and thousands of lakes). So I can only image how important the trees are for you.
    Your photos are really lovely and interesting.
    Hugs

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    1. orvokki: Lots of our forested land has been cleared for agriculture. Some of it is being replanted - and I am grateful. I would love to see your country. We don't have enough water either. In lakes or rivers...

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  34. So much beauty here! Thank you for all the photos. I love seeing the trees in their winter wear each year. And yay for the dragon trees starting to escape. :)
    Of course you love kites! They are little cousins to hot air balloons.

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    1. River Fairchild: How clever of you. I had never made the link between kites and hot air balloons. And isn't it wonderful to see escaping dragons...

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  35. How totally fun! There is some serious knitting/crocheting talent in your area!

    The pictures brought a huge smile to my face this morning. :D Thank you for that.
    Marty K.

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    1. Marty K: Lots and lots of knitting talent. None of it mine. The volunteers had classes in the visitors centre for anyone who wanted to play - another clever idea.
      And I am very glad to spread smiles across the miles.

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  36. Stunnings they are, around trees, what a surprise.

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    1. Bob Bushell: And there should be more surprises to make us smile. Many more.

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  37. Marvellous. I love this kind of thing. People over here knit and cover things too I've noted, trees and the like, but rather more randomley. Beautiful pictures as ever dear x

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    1. All Consuming: There is a bit of yarn bombing here, but it isn't as organised or co-ordinated as this. Or as approved. Hugs

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    2. 'yarn bombing'! Hahahaha the only kind I think should exist!

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    3. All Consuming: No arguments from here. And how I would like to see the super powers being forced to knit their weapons of mass destruction.

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  38. Wonderful. Yet another event that I would love to see in Canberra! Trouble is, they're all on at different times of the year..

    I think I have commented before that I am not a fan of bonsai, but they do look pretty with the blossoms on them. I am however a huge fan of bright knitwear, and quirkiness, and light, and natural materials - and trees!

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    1. Oh, and kites and their big brothers :)

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    2. Alexia: I am not a fan of bonsai either. Tree torture, much like foot binding. I can see the beauty, I appreciate it involves skill and work but...
      Like you quirkiness, colour and trees have my heart.

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  39. Warm trees... what a creative idea! Love it, and great photos!!

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    1. Apare Parts and Pics: Isn't it fun? A great idea and so well executed. Each year I smile at the thought of going, while we are there, and in memory.

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  40. Ooh, I love the second bonsai. Are those red berries or flowers? So pretty! And I want mittens made from some of those woolies!

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    1. mshatch: They are berries on the second bonsai. I think it was a type of hawthorne. I was so impressed at the leaves which were added to some of the woollies, and the fringes, and the colours...

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  41. That is just lovely, in every way. A win win win win situation, actually I can add your readers to that list, making it a fifth win

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    1. Kim: Thank you. I am always happy to showcase my city. It is much more than the politicians it is known for.

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  42. Great pictures! Volunteer knitters and crocheters decorated the trees in one of our local parks a couple years ago, and it sure did brighten up the drab winter landscape. I don't know if the pieces were used to warm people afterwards or not, but judging by how small most of them were, I kinda doubt it.

    Bonsai trees are so beautiful to look at, but I love that you called them "tortured." I never thought of it like that before, but in a way, cutting their tap roots is kinda like cutting an animal's ears and/or tail because we think they "look better" that way.

    Have a super weekend.

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    1. Susan: I do think of bonsai as tree torture. To the extent that I feel guilty for admiring it...
      I hope your weekend is wonderful.

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  43. Tree heaven! Hope the dragon trees get rooted and growing.

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    1. Susan Kane: The dragon trees have been there for over five years now. They are growing, and I assume their roots are firm.

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  44. Wonderful photos. I love the idea of colorful woolies around the trees.

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    1. Rasma Raisters: It adds a wonderful splash of colour doesn't it?

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  45. Good to hear the woolies will be repurposed. Are there any native Australian trees there?

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    1. Anna: Oh yes. The arboretum is home (at the moment) to 94 forests of rare, endangered and symbolic trees from Australia and round the world.

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  46. That was a very treey post but I do love my trees and warm trees are happy trees.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merlesworld: I also love my trees. And colour.

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  47. Having these colorful displays and protecting the trees is a great way to get kids interested in our environment and I love it. It's all just so beautiful and pretty amazing. Thanks for sharing the things you do. I really appreciate you! Hugs...RO

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    1. RO: And it is a wonderful way to get kids outside in winter too. And if you are moving around, our winter really isn't bad.

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  48. Have you posted this before? Have I been here before? Did I comment before? Anyway, it is still as wonderful as before. LOL

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    1. Grannie Annie: Not this year. Deja vue at work.

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  49. Aren't those blooming bonsai beautiful?
    Hope your weekend is colorful and serene.
    Hugs,

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    1. Sandra Cox: The bonsai blooms were lovely - but I prefer my trees full size. And the weekend is certainly serene. I hope yours is too.

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  50. From large to small. All beautiful. I love the trees in their colourful winter coats. our poor Canadian trees could certainly use similar gifts! :)

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    1. Diane Tolley: Your trees could use a much thicker winter coat. And scarf. And beanie. And mittens.

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  51. Sweaters on trees. Colorful art and the trees might actually enjoy it, too.

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    1. Jono: I didn't hear any complaints - but perhaps the trees are just stoics.

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  52. Yay! Love these pictures. I forgot about the winter snugglies and am glad to see them again :o)

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    1. HBF: I am so glad that you enjoy them - and love the term winter snugglies.

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  53. Tree scarves! How wonderful! The bonsai are so beautiful. What a skill it must be to grow them.

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    1. Bea: I love the woollies for trees but am ambivalent (at best) about bonsai. Some of them are beautiful and I am aware of the skill needed to create them. However they do make me think of foot-binding.

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  54. I was in Canberra recently but didn't make it to the Arboretum. Next time ... I agree with you about bonsai.

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    1. catmint: I hope you can get to the Arboretum. It is showing a lot of promise - and I like the sculptures which are being added to it as well.

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  55. Such wonderful photos, and so colourful.
    It's nice to see all the colours on and around the trees.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Lowcarb team member ~Jan: Thank you. I am a big fan or quirky colour.

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  56. Replies
    1. phann son: I post photos from the Warm Trees exhibition each year, but these photos are new to the post.

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  57. I remember this from last year! So completely wonderful and I'm sure the trees are grateful.

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    1. Lynn: It is a delightful idea. I wonder whether the trees do enjoy it? I hope so.

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